Posted in In the Know

Standing Still

They say if you’re lost in the woods to stay put and you’ll be found.  The urge or tendency is to begin trying to find your way and that’s often what drives one further down the lost path.  Why is it that we have such a difficult time standing still?  Do we believe there is some judgment made upon us if we just stay put?  Does it signify a surrender?

The most obvious answer to this dilemma is that those who are coming to find you know where they are.  They have definitive points that show where they are beginning and others who will monitor their process.  They are equipped to be on the move to find you so why elude them?  Why make their job more difficult?  As I speak with people across the country I hear over and over again that movement means progress.  It would if you weren’t lost, but being lost means you waste a lot of energy and often don’t make any progress.

Over the past couple of years when I’ve heard stories about lost hikers, or those who have been stranded by weather they believe there is no one out there looking for them and unfortunately that’s often not true.  Time after time when the person is found they aren’t very far from where they became lost, but they became disoriented.  Disorientation is not a grounding force in our lives.   It leaves us questioning every move we make and in the long run often leaves us without hope and in a serious condition.

Ask yourself when was the last time you were lost emotionally, physically or spiritually and then recall if you stood still or wandered aimlessly.  If you’re currently in a place where you feel lost do you have the faith that others will come find you?  How will they know you need direction?  Standing still is a difficult practice, but for many it can be life saving.

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